Gender and Inclusive Development

South African President Jacob Zuma

Mothers in ancient Sparta washed the newborn with wine to ensure it was strong.  Later the baby was brought by its father to the elders, who inspected the newborn carefully. If they found that the child was deformed or weakly they threw it into Kaiada, the so called Apothetae, a chasm at a cliff, of the mount Taygetos. (See http://www.sikyon.com/sparta/agogi_eg.html)

Woman in Agriculture Processing

PROMOTE is USAID’s largest women’s empowerment program in the Agency’s history, aimed at advancing opportunities for Afghan women who can become political, private sector, and civil society leaders. Building upon existing and previous programs for women and girls, Promote is a five-year program targeting the education, promotion, and training of a new generation of Afghan women, aged 18-30.

Child with doctors

EnCompass serves in Gender and Quality Improvement advisor roles for the AIDSFree project, which aims to improve the effectiveness of high-impact, evidence-based HIV interventions, and accelerate the speed with which these interventions are brought to scale at the country-level. EnCompass provides capacity development and technical support to USAID missions, host-country governments, and HIV/AIDS implementers as a subcontractor to John Snow, Inc.

Woman in the classroom

EnCompass and ADVANTAGE consortia partner Cardno designed and wrote two sector-specific GBV Resource Guides for USAID staff: one focused on the Education sector, including school-related GBV; and, the other focused on the Energy and Infrastructure sector. You can access and download the Resource Guides here:

Photo of young girls

EnCompass co-facilitated a skills-based, practical training course providing USAID staff with guidance on implementing the Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Policy, in order to identify best practices and lessons learned in integrating gender considerations across USAID’s Program Cycle.

Group of Women leaders

EnCompass designed and delivered a virtual mentoring program for women leaders at UNAIDS, the first in the UN System.

Cover of USAID's Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Policy

USAID’s Advancing the Agenda of Gender Equality (ADVANTAGE) IDIQ is designed to strengthen USAID's capacity to integrate gender equality and women's empowerment systematically across USAID initiatives, programs, monitoring and evaluation efforts, and procurements by providing technical assistance and training relating to gender, gender-based violence (GBV) and trafficking in persons (TIP).

Please visit our dedicated page about the ADVANTAGE IDIQ for more information. 

 

Kostas Hatzis 2010*

The European Evaluation Society (EES) has selected an inspiring topic for the upcoming EES 2014 Conference, “Evaluation for an Equitable Society,” because as evaluators we need to think about and discuss the role evaluation can play in equity, gender equality and social justice. So, I have been thinking about how I build equity in my own practice, the challenges I face, and the questions this raises for my own practice.

Lyn with Priscilla Usiobaifo, founder of Braveheart Initiative, an NGO in rural Nigeria empowering young people with information and skills on sexual and reproductve health and rights.

When I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Lesotho, about 90 percent of the male workforce  worked in South Africa, primarily in the gold mines, with few opportunities to return home to their families. One of these men was married to a neighbor of mine.

It is easy to abhor gender-based violence. Who would not be against rape, torture, mutilation, sexual slavery, forced impregnation and murder [1] of women and men on the basis of their gender? Apparently, many people. That is, many people are not against gender violence. According to the World Health Organization [2], in 2013, 35% of women have experienced violence in their lifetime. Thirty percent (30%) of women have experienced violence in an intimate relationship; and 38% of all murders of women are by an intimate partner. Support for violence against women is reflected in the following proverbs [3]:

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