Gender and Inclusive Development

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Gender inequality is cited as a major contributor to Swaziland's high HIV prevalence rate. There is no routine screening for gender-based violence by health providers in Swaziland to provide statistical data relating to the incidence or prevalence of GBV. However, a national population-based household study on violence against children (mostly girls) and young women revealed an epidemic of sexual assault against girls.

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Gender inequality is a major contributor to men who have sex with men's (MSM) vulnerability to HIV. Understanding the gender dynamics of MSM, as well as their specific sexual identity issues and concerns, is important for delivering effective HIV services. This case study describes how an NGO in Russia created an MSM-supportive environment and provided free access to HIV services through its "Follow the Voice of Life" program.

Both the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Health Initiative (GHI) emphasize preventing, monitoring, and responding to gender-based violence (GBV) as critical to strengthening overall health outcomes. Yet, significant barriers impede the provision of meaningful, effective services for children and adolescents who have experienced sexual violence.

The purpose of this situation analysis, conducted for AIDSTAR-One, was to understand what supports and hinders effective care for children who have experience sexual violence and exploitation in Lesotho. The study examined the services being implemented, facilitated, or provided by community- and facility-based partners for children who have experienced sexual violence and exploitation; what is working well; and where there are gaps.

Girls Empowerment Through Education and Health (ASPIRE) is a 4-year, $16.2 million, USAID activity implemented by Save the Children and three partners, designed to support the Government of Malawi to improve girls’ achievement in upper primary and secondary school, and ultimately, girls’ empowerment. ASPIRE has three outputs:

Girls Empowerment Through Education and Health (ASPIRE) is a 4-year, $16.2 million, USAID activity implemented by Save the Children and three partners, designed to support the Government of Malawi to improve girls’ achievement in upper primary and secondary school, and ultimately, girls’ empowerment. ASPIRE has three outputs:

Young Girl reading against stone wall

Lyn Messner and Priya Dhanani contributed to this post.

This is the story of Lerato, whose name means love. 

Lerato lived with her mother in an agricultural community in northern Lesotho. At age 17, Lerato was raped on her way home from school.

Women with GBV coordinator in DRC

EnCompass is partnering with the USAID’s Office of Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment (GenDev) to develop an Agency-Wide Gender Learning Strategy, under the ADVANTAGE IDIQ. The Strategy will provide a roadmap for USAID staff to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to advance the Agency’s development outcomes in gender equality and women’s empowerment. 

Malawian girls going to school

EnCompass conducted an external performance evaluation of Empowering Girls through Education and Health (ASPIRE), a 4-year USAID activity implemented by Save the Children in Malawi. ASPIRE, which began in 2014, aims to improve girls’ academic achievement and empowerment through innovative, cross-sectoral interventions addressing education, health, and structural and cultural factors that influence girls’ performance. ASPIRE will reach 182,000 girls aged 10 to 19.

UN Women Executive Director at Speaking event

This post was originally published on Medium.com, by UN Women's Executive Director, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, in a series of 16 blogs for the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence. EnCompass previously worked with UN Women to evaluate their regional architecture.

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